Why Travel To Brazil?

Explore one of the largest countries on earth, with our range of Brazil tours. A destination that promises to titillate the senses with a wealth of culture, landscapes, music and food!

Experience the steaming rainforest, cruising on a dugout boat on one of the most famous rivers in the world.  Witness where the Rio Negro meet the saltier, whiter waters of the Amazon and keep a look out for piranha and cayman on your travels. Or even … an anaconda!

Head to the ‘Marvellous City’ of Rio Janeiro for a real assault on the senses.  From Christ the Redeemer and Sugarloaf mountain, to the infamous Favellas, this city shows the stark gap between the rich and poor of South America.

And once you’ve mastered the samba beats and sampled the local Caipirinha cocktails, explore the wildlife on in the Pantanal.  A Brazil tour is indeed a ‘tour of a lifetime’.

Map & Highlights

Click on the orange circles to read more information about the location and its highlights.

Iguaçu Falls

Stretching across the Brazil and Argentinian borders, the mighty Iguazu Falls in fact consists of ro

Read more

Ilha Grande

Pristine forest, remote beaches and hiking trails await in this idyllic island paradise. With a col

Read more

Amazon

Accessed mainly from Manaus (the gateway to the Rainforest), a stay in the Amazon is peppered with n

Read more

Pantanal

Less accessible than its Amazonian counterpart, the Pantanal is a glorious wetland commonly referred

Read more

Paraty

A charming, colonial town with a strong Portugese influence. Tucked away between Rio and Sao Paulo,

Read more

Rio de Janeiro

Arguably one of the most iconic of South American cities, Rio lives up to its 'party-loving' reputat

Read more

Salvador de Bahia

Salvador’s charming cobbled streets frame beautiful colonial facades and churches on every corner.

Read more

Sao Paulo

Located in South-East Brazil, Sao Paulo is a fast-growing city both economically and physically. In

Read more

Chapada Diamantina

Home to some of Brazil’s most sensational hiking routes, meandering through grasslands, valleys an

Read more
  • Iguaçu Falls

    Stretching across the Brazil and Argentinian borders, the mighty Iguazu Falls in fact consists of roughly 275 distinct waterfalls. Hike the nature trails, take a boat on the rapids or merely stand in wonder from one of the glorious view points. There are plenty of places to explore at the Falls, so this is a place to both take your time and lots of photographs!

  • Ilha Grande

    Pristine forest, remote beaches and hiking trails await in this idyllic island paradise. With a colourful pirate history to explore there will be plenty of opportunities to leave the beach and satisfy your thirst for history and legend.

  • Amazon

    Accessed mainly from Manaus (the gateway to the Rainforest), a stay in the Amazon is peppered with new experiences to discover. Cruise through the flooded rainforest in search of piranha, caiman and sloths. Trek through the steaming forest, full of Brazilian flora and fauna. A truly iconic addition to any tour of Brazil.

  • Pantanal

    Less accessible than its Amazonian counterpart, the Pantanal is a glorious wetland commonly referred to as the ‘home of Brazilian wildlife’. The wetlands offer greater wildlife spotting opportunities due to the terrain, so keep a close eye out for local jaguars out on the prowl.

  • Paraty

    A charming, colonial town with a strong Portugese influence. Tucked away between Rio and Sao Paulo, the cobbled streets offer a welcome respite from the busy city life. The cobbled streets are built below sea-level so that the hide tide washes away debris with a regular flooded cleanse.

  • Rio de Janeiro

    Arguably one of the most iconic of South American cities, Rio lives up to its 'party-loving' reputation with its colourful, music driven atmosphere. Sip a caipirinha at one of the local samba houses, pop on your thongs at Copacabana Beach and visit the world-famous Christ the Redeemer statue and Sugarloaf Mountain. And that's all in just one day!

  • Salvador de Bahia

    Salvador’s charming cobbled streets frame beautiful colonial facades and churches on every corner. This UNESCO World Heritage Site is also known as the ‘African Soul of Brazil’; reflecting the easy-going, party attitude of its local inhabitants. It’s dark slave trade history has given way to a celebration of African culture and spirituality, seen most vibrantly at the annual Salvador Carnival.

  • Sao Paulo

    Located in South-East Brazil, Sao Paulo is a fast-growing city both economically and physically. In contrast to the colonial regions, the city is a maze of high rise skyscrapers and business centres. Dig a little deeper beneath the surface to discover world-class restaurants and a buzzing arts scene.

  • Chapada Diamantina

    Home to some of Brazil’s most sensational hiking routes, meandering through grasslands, valleys and mountains. Snorkel in the underground pools or cool off in river after a rigorous trek.

When to go

Bear in mind that Brazil is pretty huge and covers several different climates from North to South. Most of Brazil is in the tropics so it is generally warm all year round. Peak season is December to January (hot and humid) and during the Rio Carnival (February/March). The Pantanal and Amazon are excellent all year round, however the best time for viewing wildlife is May to October.

The South of Brazil dry season runs from Mar-Nov. The climate in this area between June and September are often described as similar to the European summertime… a bit of rain, but plenty of sun.

Temperature and Rainfall

Click a location to view temp and rainfall for that area

  • Amazon
  • Rio de Janeiro
  • Salvador de Bahia

Things to do

Go Fishing
Try your hand at traditional fishing techniques in the Amazon as you try to hook the infamous Piranha
Learn to Samba
Take a dancing lesson in the heart of Rio and head into the streets to strut your stuff at the annual Rio Carnaval!
Find a Piece of Heaven
Sail to Ilha Grande and hike one of the many trails over the island to find a secluded beach. Perfect to rest and recuperate before the hike home!

Food and drink

Feijoada
A typical Brazilian dish made mainly of meat and black beans with a few spices thrown in for good measure. Commonly referred to as Brazil’s national dish, it was originally produced by African slaves in the region.
Empanadas
If you love your pastry then give this dish a try. A mix between a pasty and a pie, made with various kinds of meat and vegetables. Our personal favourite … prawns!
Caiprihinia
Made with cachaça, lime and lots of sugar and ice! A lethal combination if you venture back to the bar more than once! Why not try different variations, including a vodka based ‘Caipiroska’ for a spirit twist on this traditional drink.

Responsible tourism

Poverty – In Brazil, there is a stark contrast between social classes and you will often find the richest communities on the same street as the poorest. For instance, in Rio the infamous favelas sit on the hillside, looking directly down onto the largest, most luxurious properties in the city. It is reported that the top 6 billionaires in Brazil have the same wealth as the 100 million poorest. Startling figures.

The Rio Times reported that more than 50 million Brazilians were living below the poverty line (http://riotimesonline.com/brazil-news/rio-politics/more-than-25-million-brazilians-living-below-poverty-line/). The minimum wage in Brazil is low, given that it is a relatively expensive country to live in.  Most service staff will be on the lowest wages, so tips from tourist are a fundamental supplement to their income.  Be careful not to ‘over-tip’.  Not only can this de-stabalise labour economics, but flashing the cash around could attract unwarranted attention

Crime– Whilst violent crime is common across the cities, there are very clear precautions that tourists can take to stay safe.  Make sure that you are familiar with your surroundings and understand the areas which are less safe. Ask your hotel or Tour Guide if you are unsure.  Try not to use satellite navigation as these can sometimes take you through areas with much higher crime rates and a lower police presence.  As with all major tourist destinations, care must be taken to protect yourself from pickpockets and robberies.  Be vigilant, don’t travel alone and leave your valuables at the hotel. Visit the Foreign and Commonwealth Office for the latest travel advice to British nationals. https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/brazil/safety-and-security

Animal Tourism – is ever present all over the world.  Whilst a large proportion of travellers visit the Pantanal and Amazon to see wildlife in their natural habitat, there are instances where wild animals are baited or restrained for photo and petting opportunities. At We Are Travel, our simple rule is to steer well clear of any activity or attraction that encourages you to hug, pet or take a selfie with a wild animal.

Visiting the Favelas (shanty towns) – The jury is still out as to whether this is an ethical tourist activity as the experience will vary on a case by case basis. The security in the favelas can change enormously from moment to moment, and violence can often break out with very little notice.  There have been instances where tourists have been injured or killed in the favelas. As a result of the increased risk, We Are Travel do not currently recommend taking a Favela Tour.

Protecting the Rainforest – We’ve all heard the statistics about deforestation of the Amazon rainforest, but it is difficult to comprehend the sheer size of the problem.  As home to around 60% of the worlds rainforest, Brazil literally has the weight of the world on its shoulders.  Thousands of tourists visit every year, and whilst this is fundamental to the economic stability of the area, it does bring its own problems. The Amazon Co-operation Treaty Organisation (http://www.otca-oficial.info/home) promotes sustainable development in the region, including the benefits of ecotourism must have for local populations.

Indigenous Tribes – The biggest reported threats to the Amazonian tribes of Brazil is the deforestation of the land and disease.   The truth is that Amazonian Tribes are traditionally isolated and do not seek out interaction with tourists or groups. It is estimated that there are around 65 uncontacted tribes in Brazil, some of which have less than 100 people left. Extinction is a real threat.  Brazilian tribes are very different to communities such as the Maasai in Kenya, where you can spend time living alongside them as part of your travels.  As a result of their isolation, they are susceptible to common colds and other mainstream ‘western’ conditions which are a growing threat.

Survival International are a UK-based charity promoting the rights and struggles of tribes around the world.  Their work includes encouraging travellers and the general public to take action and support the rights of these communities.  If you are interested in finding out more then please visit https://www.survivalinternational.org.

Sex Trafficking – Evidence suggests that child sex tourism and trafficking is widespread in many parts of Brazil, second only to Thailand. Many are forced in to prostitution or slave labour both at home and on the streets.  Tourists are asked to remain vigilant and to report all instances where they have witnessed children in danger.  Brazil currently have a 24-hour helpline (100) where any cases can be reported.

Fast facts

  • Capital city Brasilia
  • Currency Brazilian Real
  • Language Portugese
  • Time difference GMT-3
  • Flight time 14 hours
  • Best time to visit May-June (Pantanal and Amazon) Dec-March (Rio)